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How does Vision Work ?

How does Vision Work ?

How does Vision Work ? To better understand Retinal Vitreo Disorders, we must first examine how vision works. In order for one to see, a light source is required. Without light, everything is black. The light emits particles called photons, which bounce off solid objects in all directions before eventually reaching the eye. In order to see well, the tissue that they go through must be transparent. First, the cornea, located at the front...

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Cataract

Cataract

Catatact In the case of a cataract, the crystalline lens loses its transparency. The crystalline lens is this small lens behind the pupil that converges the photons on the retina, and that enables the eye to focus. If the crystalline lens becomes uniformly opaque, it will let fewer photons pass through, and vision will progressively blur, with possible alteration of color vision. If only a part of the crystalline lens becomes opaque,...

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A.M.D.

A.M.D.

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Posterior Vitreous Detachment

Posterior Vitreous Detachment

Posterior Vitreous Detachment At birth, the vitreous body is attached to the retina and stays attached until one day, as part of the natural aging process, it detaches on its own. This is what we call posterior vitreous detachment, which, as it occurs, can cause flashing lights to appear in the peripheral vision or permanent floaters called myodysopsies. This is due to opaque pieces of vitreous that come between the light source and...

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Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment If there is a strong adhesion between the retina and the vitreous, the posterior vitreous detachment can cause a traction on the retina. If the retina itself is fragile at that particular point, this can lead to a retinal tear, which will allow the intraocular fluids to go through and detach the retina. In the large majority of cases, there is nothing that indicates that a retinal detachment will occur before it...

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Macular Edema & Membrane

Macular Edema & Membrane

Macular Edema & Membranes Macular syndromes affect the macula, a small one to two millimeter area located in the center of the retina. This is where the highest concentration of visual cells is found, explaining why the macula controls the sharp, clear, central vision necessary for reading, writing, or driving. The rest of the retina is responsible for the less precise vision of the peripheral field. In all macular syndromes, no...

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