At the beginning of 25G “era”, several disadvantages were observed, and it was initially considered as a non adapted technology for difficult cases and essentially used for macular surgery.

The 23G vitrectomy was the learning standard witch optimized the access to the 25G surgery

However, with the optimisation of the new vitrectomy machines, the 25G has become the reference standard in vitreoretinal surgery.

The combination of new vitrectomy machines and new 25G cutter created the difference. The new pump system combines a faster compensatory capacity with a possibility of stronger aspiration. With the port location placed closer to the cutter, and the control of the duty cycle increasing the opening of the port, the cutter become more efficient and safer.

Referring to the vitreous cutter, the revolutionary “swiss-knife” like technology makes it possible to carry out vitrectomy, dissection, cutting, trapping, and above all, working very close to the retina with minimal risks.

Regarding the 27G systems, this standard keep all the advantages of its predecessor the 25G vitrectomy. The “swiss knife” like technology is even more delicate, and the trauma of the vitreous base is lower when working with smaller gauge instruments.

However, there are few weak points concerning the 27G technology: its main limitation lies in the vitrectomy itself, which because of reducing the gauge, becomes longer and needs to increase the aspiration level and decrease the cutting rate. The second point is the difficulty in the access to the vitreous base due to the thinness of the instruments. In addition, handling silicon oil becomes boring; extending a lot the working time except if you create an additional larger sclerotomy. For the grasping efficiency of the forceps, as apprehension area is smaller, the membrane can undesirably tear.

Referring to the laser and the light source, there are not any major differences.

In conclusion: The use of 23G technology decrease, 25G always the gold standard and 27G more and more.

Contact Details:

Email: fdbm.retine@gmail.com
Cell Phone: +33620965646

François Devin